Review

May 19 2005
Jan Sjostrom | Palm Beach Daily News

The circumstances surrounding the conjunction of John; his wife, Chloe; Chloe's brother, Sam; and Sam's wife, Sally, coun't be less promising. They're staying in a beach-side cottage, in the middle of a gay community, that Sally inherited from her brother who died of AIDS. McNally ensures thate we know the weekend is doomed, by having the characters step out of time to share their inmost thoughts with the audience. They're not nearly as articulate with one another. Gradually, it becomes clear that, like the rest of the characters, John is damaged goods. McConnell lays out John's regret, anger and self-disgust so nakedly that we want to shade our eyes. Lips Together, Teeth Apart doesn't brim with insights. It is an honest play, made deepter by a whole-hearted production.